Palaces and Pavilions of Istanbul


Istanbul has been the capital city of probably the most dominant countries and domains of the history since it’s establishment; capital Byzantium of the King Byzas’ settlements, capital Constantinople of the Byzantine Empire, and capital Istanbul of the Ottoman Empire. Thusly, it has numerous royal palaces and pavilions in Istanbul that from the Byzantine period, Ottoman period and Republic period. In this article, you can find where they are, when you can visit them and historical past of them.



After the announcement of the Republic by Atatürk, every single Ottoman castle was acquired to the Turkish individuals in this manner to the Parliament by the Law of 1924.

These royal residences were reestablished and opened to people in general as a historical center. Just the Dolmabahçe Palace kept on filling in as a presidential castle until the demise of Mustafa Kemal than it was opened to the guests. Istanbul is home to brilliant royal residences, that are dispersed over the city, from Sultanahmet to Besiktas, Ortakoy to Beylerbeyi.

From the Byzantine days, what was once Constantinople, and the castles worked during the Ottoman line, there is such a great amount to investigate and find at the stunning verifiable royal residences of Istanbul.



Palaces

The absolute most significant royal residences and structures or booths in Istanbul are:

From the Byzantine Period:

Great Palace

Most significant and biggest Byzantine royal residence worked by Constantine the Great in the fourth century in the downtown area, today’s Sultanahmet neighborhood. Its floor mosaics can be seen at the Mosaics Museum simply behind the Blue Mosque.

Constantine Porphyrogenetus Palace

Known as Tekfur castle today, it’s situated at Kariye neighborhood joined to the city dividers, close to the Chora church exhibition hall.

Blakherna Palace

It was a mid-year living arrangement based on the city dividers close to the Golden Horn, from which today exists just the Anemas Dungeons and Tekfur castle.



Bryas Palace

A mid-year living arrangement worked in the ninth century on the Asian side of the city, probably in today’s Kucukyali neighborhood or somewhat further east at Dragos – Cevizli region. Just a few remainings left.

Manganoi (Mangana) Palace

Located inside the Topkapi Palace dividers and between Sirkeci – Cankurtaran train stations. Just a few remainings left.

Rhegion Palace

A mid-year castle worked by Theodosius I and is situated at the passageway of Kucukcekmece locale, on the old Via Egnazia street to Rome. Just a few remainings left.



Iukundianae Palace

A late spring royal residence was situated between the Yenimahalle – Bakirkoy region along the Sea of Marmara. Not a lot made due until today.

Magnaura Palace

Another late spring royal residence situated between Yenimahalle – Bakirkoy region along the shore. Not a lot made due until today.

Myrelaion Palace

A late spring home situated among Aksaray and Laleli regions. Not many remains were found during the unearthings.

Boukoleon Palace

A mid-year living arrangement close Catladikapi neighborhood, among Sirkeci and Florya on the shoreline. It was based on the city dividers.



Damatrys Palace

A mid-year habitation and chasing Pavillion worked in Samandira neighborhood close Yakacik locale. Not a lot left today.

Others

There were numerous other Byzantine royal residences that we know from old engravings. Yet, none of them have made due until our days.

Some of them were Hagios Agathonis Palace toward the southeast of Forum Tauri, Forum Tauri Palace of Leon I, Kosmas and Damianos Palace close Sophia dock, Basilica Palace worked by Emperess Aelia Verina close Sophia wharf, Bonus Palace worked by Romanos I close to today’s Karagumruk Stadium in Edirnekapi, Helenianae Palace worked by the mother of Constantine the Great probably in Kserolophos (today’s Cerrahpasa neighborhood), and another royal residence of Emperess Irene in Vlanga (today’s Aksaray – Yenikapi neighborhoods).



There were numerous different royal residences or pavillions outside the city dividers as well, these were particularly summer homes of eminence; Pigi Palace close to today’s Silivrikapi neighborhood, Aretai (or Aretas) Palace probably close to today’s Maltepe locale, Hydralis Palace close to today’s Kagithane neighborhood, Philopation Palace probably in today’s Rami or Eyup area, Damianu Palace close to today’s Ortaköy neighborhood, Therapia (today’s Tarabya neighborhood) Palace, Khalkedon (today’s Kadiköy region) Palace, Hieria Palace in today’s Fenerbahce neighborhood, Rufinianai Palace in today’s Caddebostan neighborhood, etc.

From the Ottoman Period:

Old Palace

First Ottoman royal residence worked in Istanbul after the Conquest of Constantinople in 1453. It was situated at Bayezit, on the grounds of Istanbul University today.



  • Topkapi Palace
  • Dolmabahce Palace
  • Beylerbeyi Palace
  • Ibrahim Pasha Palace
  • Yildiz Palace
  • Ciragan Palace
  • Adile Sultan Palace
  • Feriye Palaces
  • Ihlamur Kasri
  • Maslak Kasri
  • Kucuksu Kasri
  • Aynalikavak Kasri
  • Sepetciler Kasri
  • Tophane Kasri
  • Hidiv Kasri
  • Malta Kosku
  • Huber Kosku

Ataturk Florya Kiosk

The Sea Pavilion was worked in 1935 on the shores of the Sea of Marmara, in Florya neighborhood. It filled in as a late spring living arrangement for previous Turkish presidents, starting with Atatürk.

The Pavillion was changed over into a gallery in 1988 with certain articles and photographs having a place with our extraordinary pioneer. Today, it’s available to people in general during the weekdays, aside from on Mondays and Thursdays (Phone: 212 4265151).



Topkapi

Topkapi was the primary Ottoman royal residence to be assembled (1466-1478) in the recently conquered capital of the Empire by Mehmet II. Situated on the spot where the establishments of the city were first laid in quite a while by Megarian Chief Byzas in the seventh century BC, the castle brags one the most wonderful perspectives on Istanbul, consolidating the Bosphorus, the Golden Horn, the two shores and the ocean of Marmara.

In contrast to the European royal residences, Topkapi is not a solitary momentous structure; however, an increasingly natural complex made up of different stands, nurseries, and regions spread over the tip of the authentic landmass at the passage of the Golden Horn.



Topkapi Palace filled in as the living arrangement of Ottoman sultans for around 400 years until Abdulmecid constructed the Dolmabahce Palace. In its primes, between 8-10 thousand individuals were living in the castle, generally being the Janissaries. It was transformed into a gallery in 1924 and has turned out to be one of the most appealing royal residence exhibition halls on the planet.

The most appealing display corridors of the castle are treasury, Islamic holly relics, ensembles of the sultans, divan, array of mistresses, kitchens, Chinese porcelains, and a few stands, for example, the Baghdad, Revan, Sofa, and Mecidiye. There are engaging eating and resting offices for guests on the royal residence grounds with an incredible view.



Open every day between 9:30-5:00 p.m. but Tuesdays.

Tel: (212) 512 04 80

Dolmabahce

Dolmabahçe was worked in neo-extravagant style between 1843-1856 in the quickly developing northern area of the city, at the Marmara outlet of the Bosphorus, to supplant the Topkapi Palace which was out designed.

The planner was Karabet Balyan, head engineer of Sultan Abdulmecit. It has three stories incorporating the storm cellar with asymmetric structure, with 285 rooms, 43 corridors, 6 Turkish showers.

The dock is 600 meters in length, and the castle has two flawlessly enhanced amazing entryways offering access to its patio. The gigantic dance hall has a 4,5 tons gem light fixture dangling from its 36 meters high roof.



Dolmabahce housed Sultans and their families before the Republic, and Mustafa Kemal Atatürk then utilized it during his visits to Istanbul. Atatürk kicked the bucket here on the tenth of November, 1938.

The royal residence presently fills in as a historical center and a visitor house utilized for gatherings for significant outside statesmen during their official visits.

Open day by day between 9:00-4:00 p.m. but Mondays

Tel: (212) 236 90 00

Yildiz

Yildiz, one of the last living arrangements of the Ottoman sultans, was finished by Abdulhamit II toward the finish of the nineteenth century. The Sale (Chalet), the biggest and most impeccable of the structures, uncovers the extravagance where the sultans lived and engaged.



Two separate structures shape the chalet; initial one implicit 1889 and the subsequent one, known as Merasim Kosku (formal stand), in 1898 by draftsman Raimondo D’Aronco. The Yildiz royal residence is known as the fourth Ottoman royal residence, worked in Istanbul after the Conquest.

Set in an enormous park of blooms, tulips, plants, and trees accumulated from all aspects of the world, containing a pool and green houses, the royal residence grounds offer one of the most wonderful all-encompassing perspectives on the Bosphorus.

Open day by day between 8:30-5:00 p.m. but Mondays and Thursdays



Note: Closed for rebuilding efforts in 2018-2019

Tel: (212) 276 10 22

Beylerbeyi

Beylerbeyi was at first the living arrangement of the Governor-General responsible for Anatolia; however, it was remade in the style of Dolmabahce and Çiragan castles as an illustrious royal residence in the between 1861-1865 on the Asian side of the Bosphorus and filled in like the mid-year living arrangement of the sultans. The castle was requested by Sultan Abdulaziz to the designers Sarkis Balyan and Agop Balyan in neo-ornate engineering with a customary Ottoman house plan.



Beylerbeyi is based on two primary floors and a storm cellar containing kitchens and capacity, and was isolated into two segments; Selamlik (men’s segment) and Harem. There is a sum of 3 passageways, 6 staterooms, and 26 littler rooms.

The royal residence is situated at Beylerbeyi neighborhood, north of the Uskudar region, alongside the intercontinental suspension scaffold that worked in 1974. It has extraordinary perspectives on the Bosphorus and its European shores, and wonderful grounds with terraced gardens.

Open every day between 9:00-5:00 p.m. but Mondays

Tel: (216) 321 93 20



Ciragan

The name Ciragan originates from “cerag,” which means burn in Persian. The zone where the Palace is found was called Ceragan due to the acclaimed Ottoman gatherings which were held in tulip gardens with lights. The royal residence was worked during the rule of Abdulmecit and was planned by the Armenian draftsman Serkis Balyan.

The structure was developed utilizing the monetary advances that were acquired for rebuilding the water arrangement of Istanbul and the development of another railroad. The development took 12 years.



This is the last castle worked by the Ottoman Empire for the illustrious family. Tragically the principle building was demolished by fire on the sixth of January 1910. Just the outside dividers stayed from the structure. The principal building has been revamped, and with the expansion of a cutting edge in constructing, the site has been changed over to a fine inn. The other enduring structures in the complex are being utilized as schools.

Open regular, it’s an inn now (Ciragan Palace Kempinski)

Phone: (212) 326 46



Ihlamur Kasri

Ihlamur Kiosk is a magnificent rest house that worked in Linden trees (Ihlamur in Turkish) in the Besiktas region, where you can have some espresso or some Linden tea. The structure was worked between 1849-1855 by the desire of Sultan Abdulmecit as a resting manor, where he additionally got a portion of his outside visitors, including the French artist Lamartine. Its modeler was Nikogos Balyan, a renowned supreme planner around then.

Ihlamur Pavilion is shaped by two structures; Merasim booth utilized for functions, and Maiyet stand held for the court of the sultan or his group of concubines.



After the demise of sultan Abdulmecit, the structure was likewise utilized by the sultans Abdulaziz and Mehmet Resat as a loosening upstand. It’s opened as a historical center in 1987. Exquisite royal rest house worked amidst Linden trees, where you can have some espresso, or as the Turkish word ihlamur suggests, some Linden tea.

The structure was worked between 1849-1855 by the Sultan Abdulmecit as a resting manor, where he was additionally getting a portion of his visitors, including the French writer Lamartine.

Its’ engineer was Nikagos Balyan, one of the individuals from the Balyan family who were acclaimed royal draftsmen around then. Two structures frame Ihlamur Pavilion; Merasim stands utilized for services, and Maiyet booth saved for the court of the sultan or his collection of mistresses.



After the passing of Abdulmecit, the structure was additionally utilized by the sultans Abdulaziz and Mehmet Resat as a loosening up booth. It’s opened as a historical center in 1987.

Open day by day between 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. but Mondays and Thursdays

Tel: (212) 261 29 91

Value: 20 TL

Maslak Kasri

The sultan’s chasing lodge and a resting place. Maslak Pavilion is a blend of a few booths worked during the hours of Sultan Abdulaziz (1861-1876). Stands which are made due until our days are; Kasr-I Humayun (majestic booth), Mabeyn-I Humayun (magnificent court), Limonluk (lemon chateau), Cadir, and Pasalar (officers). The majestic stand has the room and working room of the Sultan Abdulhamit II.



The complex was opened as an exhibition hall in 1986. One of the structures of the royal residence currently fills in as a cafeteria.

Open day by day between 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. but Mondays.

Tel: (212) 276 10 22

Kucuksu Kasri

Sultan Abdulmecit worked Kucuksu Kasri on the BosphorusKucuksu Pavilion in the mid-nineteenth century at the area known as Bagce-I Goksu along the Bosphorus Strait, close to the Anatolian Fortress on the Asian side.

The structure was done in 1857 by the royal designer Nikogos Balyan. It sits on three stories, including the storm cellar where there were kitchens and extra spaces. Kucuksu was utilized as a chasing lodge or a resting place by a few sultans and reestablished by Sultan Abdulaziz getting by until our days.



The structure has a European style in its design, rooms and corridors are adorned with impeccable chimneys made of Italian marble, fine wood parquet floor, European furnishings, gem light fixtures, and mirrors with sultans’ Tugra, Hereke rugs, compositions and so forth.

Kucuksu Kasri was utilized as a state visitor house for quite a while during the Republic time frame and then opened to people in general as a gallery. There is a little cafeteria in the Pavilion grounds where you can sit and appreciate ships passing while at the same time tasting your Turkish tea or Turkish espresso.



Open every day between 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. but Mondays.

Tel: (216) 332 33 03

Aynalikavak Kasri

Aynalikavak Pavilion is situated at Haskoy neighborhood on the Golden Horn. Initially, the zone was brimming with rural fields during the Byzantine time frame and then with timberlands during the Ottoman time frame, where the sultans fabricated wooden hotels for their loosening up remains.

After the development of the shipyards, the region has picked up significance, and the stone made Aynalikavak Pavilion, and a few different stands were worked between eighteenth, nineteenth hundreds of years, the complex was referred to by the individuals as the Shipyard Palaces.



The land exterior sits on two stories and the ocean side veneer on three. The structure has a Divan room, and a group of spectators corridor (Arz Odasi in Turkish) beautified with sultans’ Tugras, numerous calligraphy works, pleasant windows, and mirrors.

The roof is secured with a vault. On the lower floor of the Pavilion, there is an examination community for conventional old Turkish melodic instruments where, at times, Turkish customary music shows are being held.

The Aynalikavak is opened to the general population in 1985 as a historical center. After some season of rebuilding efforts during which it was shut as of late, it’s opened to the open again toward the finish of 2010.



Open every day between 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. but Mondays.

Tel: (212) 227 34 41

Sepetciler Kasri

Sepetciler Kasri in IstanbulIt’s situated at the Sarayburnu region at the Eminonu region, at the passageway of the Golden Horn. The Kiosk was worked in the sixteenth century by Sultan Murat III inside the grounds of Topkapi Palace. It was remodeled by Sultan Mahmud I in 1739. It was likewise utilized as boat storage for royal rafts, and the sultans used to watch their naval force leaving or coming back to/from a crusade.



During the Republic period, the Sepetciler Kiosk was utilized as a military drug store and then left void until its rebuilding in the late 1980s. These days, an area of it fills in as an International Press Center of the General Directorate of Press. Another area was a prevalent eatery until certain years back. The structure isn’t available to the overall population.

Tel: (212) 519 18 17

Tophane Kasri

The Tophane Pavilion gets its name from Tophane (which means Cannon processing plant in Turkish, where there was one) neighborhood. It’s situated on Necatibey road alongside the Nusretiye mosque and was one of the most significant structures on Tophane Square during the Ottoman time frame. The stand was requested by Sultan Abdulmecid and worked by the British designer William James Smith in 1852.



It was particularly utilized for the sultans visiting weapons production lines in the area and to get remote guests going to the port by the ocean, for example, the Russian Czar’s sibling Grand duke Konstantin.

Tophane Kiosk runs parallel to the shore on a square shape plan sitting on two stories. It has a European style like every single other structure of a similar period, with fine handwork roof enrichments and marble chimneys. Right now, Tophane Kiosk is shut to guests and administrated by the Fine Arts personnel of Mimar Sinan University.



Close by this Kiosk; there are Istanbul Modern Arts historical center, Tophane wellspring, Nusretiye mosque, Kilic Ali Pasha mosque, old Turkish shower, and Cannon production line as locales of enthusiasm for this area.

Hidiv Kasri

Hidiv Pavilion is situated on the slopes of the Cubuklu neighborhood in the Beykoz region on the Asian side of Istanbul. It was worked in 1907 by Italian engineer Delfo Seminati as a living arrangement for the Ottoman representative (Hidiv or Khedive) of Egypt, Abbas Hilmi Pasha.

The manor sits in an enormous territory. At the principal entrance, there is an amazing wellspring, rising right to the rooftop, which is secured with stain glass. Other fine wellsprings and pools encompass the structure.



A few rooms and corridors are associated with one another on a circle plan, and there is a huge lobby at the ground level with a chimney. On the upper floors, there are two incredible rooms. The pinnacle is the most well-known segment of the booth as a result of its view over the Bosphorus; one can access to the patio on top with a lift or by stairs.

The Hidiv stand was offered to the Istanbul Municipality during the 1930s and not utilized much until the 1980s. Following a multi-year rebuilding period, Hidiv Kiosk was opened in 1984 as an inn, eatery, and cafeteria. It’s open regular.

Tel: (216) 413 92 53



Malta Kosku

The Malta Kiosk is situated in the Yildiz Park at Besiktas locale. It was worked in the mid-nineteenth century by the Sultan Abdulaziz in this intensely forested park. It utilized as a loosening up house for the two sultans and their women pondering in the pleasantly minded vegetation.

At certain times of the late Ottoman history, the chateau has likewise seen emotional minutes, for example, segregation or outcast of youthful beneficiaries or sovereigns, Murad V, to name one.



The booth has a beautiful European style with Acanthus leaves section capitals, fine friezes on the marble wellspring at the passage, gold-leafed mirror, and roof enrichments with fat marble fish statuettes.

The house wasn’t utilized much during the Republic period until 1979, then it was reestablished and opened to the general population. Today, there is an eatery and cafeteria, which is open regular.

Tel: (212) 258 94 93

Huber Kosku

Huber Mansion is situated at the Tarabya region along the European shores of the Bosphorus. Its careful development date and designer isn’t known; however, most presumably, it was worked by the Italian engineer D’Aronco in the nineteenth century for a German weapons seller, Mr. Auguste Huber.



The house was reached out with new developments included at various periods, as should be obvious today.

When Huber family left the chateau during the attack of Istanbul after World War I, the house changed a few hands until it was at long last dispossessed by the Government in 1985 and changed over into a Presidential summer home. Other than the fundamental structure, the manor has a steady, carport, hirelings house, two little chalets, and a nursery.

Huber Mansion is a Government property and shut to the open visits.



Pavilions

Ihlamur Pavilion

Situated in the Ihlamur valley, among Yildiz and Nisantasi neighborhoods lying behind the back slopes of Besiktas, the Ihlamur Pavilion is one of the most delightful structures of Istanbul with an awesome structure.

We prescribe you to visit Ihlamur Pavilion, which has been utilized by Sultan Ahmed III as a private nursery and has a decent breakfast in its bistro.

Maslak Pavilion

Maslak Pavilion is situated on the Buyukdere road, among Istinye and Tarabya joints of Maslak. Having a late nineteenth-century Ottoman engineering, it is set in a lush green park covering a territory of 170,000 m2. It has an excellent view over Bosphorus waterway.



Kucuksu Pavilion

Kucuksu Pavilion is a pretty structure found close by the Anadolu Fort, by the Bosphorus Asian shores. It was worked in 1857 and was intended for the short remains of the Ottoman Sultans, who were away from the magnificent living arrangement for chasing in the forest here.

Sepetciler Kasri

It’s situated at the Sarayburnu region in Eminönü neighborhood, at the passage of the Golden Horn. The Kiosk was worked in the sixteenth century by Sultan Murat III inside the grounds of Topkapi Palace. It was revamped by Sultan Mahmud I in 1739. It was additionally utilized as boat storage for supreme pontoons where the sultans used to watch their naval force leaving or coming back from a crusade.



During the Republic period, the Sepetciler Kiosk was utilized as a military drug store and then left void until its reclamation in the late 1980s. Today, an area of the structure fills in as the International Press Center of the General Directorate of Press, and another segment is a mainstream café and night club. The eatery is open ordinary. It gets occupied for Sunday early lunches, yet the Press Center isn’t available to the overall population.

Tel: (212) 519 18 17

Aynalikavak Kasri

Aynalikavak Pavilion is situated at Haskoy neighborhood on the shores of the Golden Horn.



Initially, the territory was brimming with agrarian fields during the Byzantine time frame and then with timberlands during the Ottoman time frame, where the sultans constructed wooden houses for their unwinding.

After the development of numerous shipyards, the zone has picked up significance, and the stone made Aynalikavak Pavilion. A few different booths were worked between eighteenth, nineteenth hundreds of years, and the complex was referred to by the individuals as the Shipyard Palaces.

The land façade sits on two stories and the ocean side façade on three. The structure has a Divan room, and a group of spectators lobby (Arz Odasi in Turkish) is adorned with sultans’ Tugras, fine calligraphy works, pleasant windows, and mirrors.



The roof is secured with a vault. On the lower floor of the Pavilion, there is an exploration place for customary old Turkish melodic instruments where, at times, Turkish conventional music shows are being held. The Aynalikavak is opened to people in general in 1985 as an exhibition hall.

Open every day between 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. but Mondays and Thursdays.

Tel: (212) 256 97 50

Confirmation: 20 TL

Khedive Pavilion

By taking a taxi to Kanlıca you can visit Khedive Pavilion. A visit to the region is deficient without eating Kanlıca yogurt with powdered sugar and a visit to the Handcrafts Market. You should spoon the flavorful yogurt endlessly, walking around the slows downloaded up with glass knickknacks, high-quality gifts, and extras.



It takes 10 minutes by taxi to the Khedive Pavilion in Çubuklu. The Khedive of Egypt Abbas Hilmi Paşa manufactured this structure in the Art Nouveau style during his stay in Istanbul. “Khedive” was the title given to the legislative leader of Egypt during the Ottoman time frame.

You should take after a house with its out of this world pinnacle; the chateau has saved its leaf-designed recolored glass entryways, dividers secured with texture, mosaic roofs, and pendant crystal fixtures. Today, the structure houses a slick café and a first-class setting favored for different unique occasions.



Meriting a break, sit at one of the tables in the sunlit nursery encompassed by blooms and request the menu, which, cheerfully, incorporates nourishment and refreshments from the Ottoman cooking.

You can sit tight for my Arefe meatballs with aniseed, almond, cardamom and cinnamon, and tamarind sherbet; and feel as though Abbas Hilmi Paşa will sit next to you and state “Respected to make your colleague, my dear!”

Savaş Ateş

I'm a software engineer. I love Istanbul. I have been to 10 different countries. Istanbul is in the top 3 cities. I like to play soccer too :)

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